22 Feb

Your Rights Are Written in Stone!

To mark the 10th anniversary of the unveiling of the Dublin Human Rights and Poverty Stone on Cutsom House Quay (Dublin 1), the Irish 17 October Committee and ATD are facilitating a series of workshops in the North East Inner City of Dublin. This project is entitled  “Your Rights Are Written In Stone”.

Participants will talk about human rights and poverty and discover ATD’s new exhibition of banners illustrating the history and international context of the Dublin Human Rights and Poverty Stone.

Participants will also be invited to write, draw or paint a word, name or image you associate with basic human rights and poverty on a small stone which will be included in a very special exhibition on next End Poverty Day, 17 October 2018.

Discover here the banners from the exhibition!

Download the exhibition booklet here!

Like the project Facebook page here!

This project is supported by the Dublin City Council and the Department of the Taoiseach via the North East Inner City Programme!

 

  
22 Feb

Let’s make the best Irish anti-poverty plan ever! Have your say before Saint Patrick’s Day!

On 16th February 2018, the Irish Government launched its public consultation on a new National Action Plan for Social Inclusion 2018-2021. This move follows the commitment included in the Programme for Partnership Government to develop a new Integrated Framework for Social Inclusion, to tackle inequality and poverty.

The former plan quickly named NAPinclusion (National Action Plan for Social Inclusion 2007-2016 and update) identified a wide range of targeted actions and interventions to support the overall objective of achieving the National Social Target for Poverty Reduction (NSTPR). It adopted a life-cycle approach with goals set for each group: children; people of working age; older people and communities.  The focus of the last implementation years of this plan was on modernising the social protection system, improving effectiveness and efficiency of social transfers and strengthening active inclusion policies.

Now the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection is in the early stages of developing the new National Action Plan/Integrated framework and would like to hear views of the civil society (citizens and organisations). The consultation is by Survey Monkey with a deadline of Friday 16th March. A PDF of the Survey questions is available here to assist with the filling in the online survey.

Have your say! And join the ATD Walk As One initiative to make the next plan the best ever!

A few days after the launch of the consultation, EAPN Ireland (member of the European Anti-Poverty Network) published its Poverty Briefing 2018 and proposals for a new Anti-Poverty Strategy.

A Poverty Briefing published today by the European Anti-Poverty Network (EAPN) Ireland has highlighted that if the Government wants to tackle the high levels of poverty in Ireland it needs to take action at the highest level and across all Government departments.

Despite some recent progress the Government is failing in its commitments to tackle poverty, with some groups in society at particular risk. There are currently 394,900 people in consistent poverty in Ireland, including around 141,700 children. Paul Ginnell, the Director of EAPN Ireland stated that “The last social inclusion plan completely failed as the commitment to make it a priority from the top of Government wasn’t there. This time the Government must be serious and the new plan ambitious in its goals and implementation if we are ever to have any chance of eradicating poverty and its causes from our society”.

The Poverty Briefing 2018 presents up to date information on the levels of poverty and the issues behind them. It spells out many of the specific issues which impact directly on the lives of people. These relate to inadequate income, lack of access to a range of core services such as health, housing and literacy, numeracy and childcare and the need for quality employment for those who can work.

Finally the Briefing calls for a commitment and action across Government to address poverty and its causes and as the Government begins its consultation on a new social inclusion plan. It outlines a range of proposals which an all Government strategy needs to implement if it to be serious in tackling the causes of poverty. The proposals are for:

  • A comprehensive and ambitious strategy
  • A strategy for a decent income
  • A strategy for quality jobs
  • A strategy for quality services
  • A strategy to end homelessness and ensure housing for all
  • A strategy based on human rights, dignity and equality
  • A strategy which we can afford

Download the Poverty Briefing 2018 and proposals for a new Anti-Poverty Strategy.

 

  
15 Feb

The “I Have A Dream” campaign kicked off with its first creative writing workshop

The “I Have A Dream” campaign kicked off with its first creative writing workshop facilitated by Fighting Words in Dublin 1.

The legacy of Martin Luther King is the inspiration for the ATD Dublin youth group who officially kicked off their creative writing campaign Ireland, I Have a Dream on Tuesday 13th February. 

The Unity in the Community youth group are an ATD project run from the ATD office in Dublin’s North inner city.

Participants in Ireland, I Have a Dream will be encouraged to write about the dreams they have to stop persistent poverty in Ireland through the context of their own story.

The movement began on the 13th February with a booked out creative writing workshop administered by Fighting Words, which provides free tutoring and mentoring in creative writing and related arts.

The project runs from now until the 4th of April (the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King) with a launch event and publication of speeches in  May 2018. Later the publication will be presented at the European Parliament in Strasbourg during the YO Fest 2018  and the EYE 2018.

For all information about how to take part, guidelines, latest news and details of workshops visit ihaveadream.ie.

Although most famous for his work in civil rights, Martin Luther King was also an anti-poverty activist. On the 50th year of the anniversary of his death, the youth group explored the legacy of Martin Luther King and were inspired by his infamous ‘I, Have a Dream speech’.

The group decided to start a campaign in which they could use their creative mind and voice to connect ‘I Have A Dream’ to their own lives. The ATD Youth Group will attempt to help young people to find strength in sharing their experiences, finding their singular and unified voices. The campaign is designed to provide a new space in Ireland for young people between the ages of 16-25 with the aim of empowering participants and inspiring others to keep fighting to stop poverty, find their voice as leaders and to explore the inequalities of poverty in the context of their own lives. This is a creative writing project with an emphasis on the word creative. The UC youth group will welcome submissions from classes, youth groups and individuals. Whether young people take part in a workshop or not, it’s all the same so long as groups follow the guidelines and have fun!

The campaign is supported by Dublin Footballer Jonny Cooper, who joined the project as an ambassador. Cooper noted “Having met this group I was struck with their level of self-awareness, empathy and care to provide better future opportunities for young people. I am delighted to be involved with a determined group of people who are driven to be trail blazers and create change”.

The project is co-funded by the Irish Coca-Cola Thank You Fund and the Foundation ATD in Paris.

 

 

 

  
14 Feb

When Voices Unite for Social Justice – Songs to sing along on Social Justice Day!

Sing Along Evening – Tuesday 20th February, 7pm to 9pm

In the Hall of Killarney Court
Community Building- Dublin 1

Entrance to the venue via the “Home” memorial plaza
at the junction of Buckingham St and Sean McDermott St

On World Social Justice Day, All Together in Dignity (ATD) invites you to join a “Sing Along Evening” and raise your voice in songs of hope and dignity.

The evening is an informal get together with karaoke, guitars and readings of inspiring texts for social justice activists.

As 2018 marks 70 years since the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 Dec 1948, Paris), the evening will also be the opportunity to launch “Your Rights Are Written in Stone”, a project by ATD in the North Inner City of Dublin.

Join ATD volunteers and community activists to sing together “We shall overcome”, “In the name of love”, “how can a poor man stand such times and live”, “Keep your Eyes on the prize”… and many more social justice songs!

RSVP for this event: www.eventbrite.ie

Invitation poster to post and share here: Invitation Poster

If you want to prepare yourself to join the songs… here a few recordings performed by our friend Elaine who will help us to sing on the day!
We may also sing “Molly Malone”, “Lean on me”, “Let it be” and “Something Inside So Strong”

Dirty Old Town

Pride (In the name of Love)

We Shall Overcome

Keep Your Eyes on the Prize

How Can a Poor Man Stand Such Things and Live

Glory

Oró Sé do Bheatha ‘Bhaile

Be also ready for a German-French…and almost English song:


And the great finale with Glory!

  
14 Feb

On 14 February, we remember the legacy of Joseph Wresinski

On 14 February 1988, 30 years ago, Joseph Wresinski passed away. He was 71.

He is the initiator of the United Nations’ #EndPoverty Day (each 17 October) and the spiritual father of the UN Guiding Principles on Human Rights and Extreme Poverty (adopted in 2012).

Together with French sociologist Jules Klanfer, he first introduced in 1965 and developed the concept of “social exclusion”, now a concept broadly used worldwide.

All his life, he was a strong advocate of people trapped in chronic  poverty for generations.  The “Wresinski approach” inspires new ways to fight poverty worldwide. It recognises people with experience of poverty as partners in designing, implementing, monitoring and assessing public policies. In 1957, Wresinski  founded the NGO ATD in a slum near Paris which has become today All Together in Dignity with 100 projects in 40 countries.

On 14 February each year, friends of ATD are invited to read and reflect on the very last address made by Wresinski. He wrote this to the long term volunteers from his hospital bed just days before his death on 14 February 1988.

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Joseph Wresinski was born on 12 February 1917 to immigrant parents, detained in a French internment camp because of WW1. Later, his family suffered from chronic poverty and social exclusion in a poor neighbourhood of Angers, France.

In 1946, he was ordained as a priest and served in industrial and rural parishes where, right from the beginning, he related to the most deprived families.

In 1956, he was assigned chaplain to 250 families in a emergency housing camp in Noisy-le-Grand, near Paris. The families lived in quonset (nissan) huts erected in a muddy field. He said about his years in Noisy-le-Grand: “The families in that camp have inspired everything I have undertaken for their liberation. They took hold of me, they lived within me, they carried me forward, they pushed me to found ATD with them.”

In 1957, Joseph Wresinski and the families of the camp founded the first association which was later to become All Together in Dignity Fourth World.

Responding to the demands of the families and working with them, the soup kitchen and the distribution of old clothes were replaced with a library, kindergarden, chapel and workshop. Volunteers came to join the action and a Research Institute on extreme poverty was created to bring together researchers from different countries and disciplines.

Since its beginning the development of ATD was inspired by Joseph Wresinski’s own experience as a child in a poverty-stricken family and by his daily contacts with families in extreme poverty and members of ATD International Long Term Volunteer Corps.

Joseph Wresinski’s firm purpose was to unite all sections of society around the poorest. With this aim he met leaders of States, churches and international bodies from all over the world. Even though he was a catholic priest, he believed that every man or woman he met represented a chance for the poorest and he was determined that  ATD would remain non-denominational and open to people of all cultures, faiths, beliefs…

His appointment to France’s Economic and Social Council in 1979 was a significant step in his quest for official representation of people in extreme poverty. With the publication in France of the “Wresinski Report” in 1987, he succeeded in gaining recognition of people in poverty as partners in society. This report enabled him also to put “extreme poverty” on the Human Rights agenda.

On 17 October 1987, in the presence of 100,000 people from every social background and continent, Joseph Wresinski unveiled a commemorative stone in the Trocadero Human Rights Plaza in Paris. On this marble his call is engraved: “Wherever men and women are condemned to live in poverty, human rights are violated. To come together to ensure that these rights be respected is our solemn duty.”

17 October was declared “International Day for the Eradication of Poverty” by the United Nations in 1992. In several countries, each year or even on the 17th of each month, people gather for a short commemoration in honor of people who suffer from extreme poverty, and to renew their commitment to fight alongside them.

Visit also: www.joseph-wresinski.org

  
08 Feb

When Voices Unite for Social Justice: Sing Along Get Together on 20 February 2018

Sing Along Evening – Tuesday 20th February, 7pm to 9pm –
Killarney Court Community Building- Dublin 1

Entrance to the venue via the “Home” memorial plaza
at the junction of Buckingham St and Sean McDermott St, Dublin 1

On World Social Justice Day, All Together in Dignity (ATD) invites you to join a “Sing Along Evening” and raise your voice in songs of hope and dignity.

The evening is an infomal get together with karaoke, guitars and readings of inspiring texts for social justice activists.

As 2018 marks 70 years since the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (10 Dec 1948, Paris), the evening will also be the opportunity to launch “Your Rights Are Written in Stone”, a project by ATD in the North Inner City of Dublin. Join ATD volunteers and community activists to sing together “We shall overcome”, “In the name of love”, “how can a poor man stand such times and live”, “Keep your Eyes on the prize”… and many more social justice songs!

RSVP for this event: www.eventbrite.ie

Invitation poster to post and share here: Invitation Poster